Cool Season Container Herbs for the South A Trio of Tastiness for Fall, Winter & Early Spring


Cool Season Container Herbs for the South
  • Posted January 15, 2017

Gardeners in the South certainly have the advantage when it comes to extending the growing season. Cool season herbs can be started late in the summer and be ready for harvesting in late autumn, into the winter and early spring. What you decide to grow can be influenced by your favorite recipes or a scent you'd care to indulge in for a little while longer. Grow herbs that you'll use in your favorite culinary creations and try a new one or two just for kicks!

The easiest way to grow cool season herbs is in containers. Container grown herbs are super easy to care for and are mobile; meaning you can move them around wherever and whenever you heart desires. Herbs in containers will also add some decoration to your abode, line them up along your porch steps or group them on your apartment balcony.

Check out these herbs and see if they make the cut for your cool season herb collection

Chives

Chives (Allium schoenoprasum) are loved for their distinct flavor and aroma. You can snip the long slender leaves time and time again for fresh flavor in your kitchen. The flowers can also be harvested and used as a delicate garnish to make any dish a little fancy. Place freshly potted up chives in a reliably sunny spot. They do best with regular water and monthly feeding. Harvest leaves as needed by cutting from the outside of the clump, leaving at least a half inch at the base for regrowth.

Cilantro, Coriander

Cilantro (Coriandrum sativum) is widely used for Thai, Chinese and Mexican dishes. It prefers growing in the cooler months and will reward you with multiple harvests of bright green leaves that are full of flavor and a distinct aroma all its own. Once the spring starts to warm things up, your plants will take off and start to flower. Use the seeds, once they've turned brown, known as Coriander, for recipes or to start a new generation of Cilantro. You can also pair your Cilantro with pansies for a little more flair!

Parsley (Petroselinum crispum var. neapolitanum) Parsley (Petroselinum crispum var. neapolitanum) is very easy to grow in virtually any location, so have at it! The dark green leaves of Parsley are a popular garnish and have been for quite some time. They have a delicious flavor that can be incorporated into just about any recipe, fresh or dried. Plant your Parsley in a container by itself or intermingle with other herbs and annuals to add a soft, delicate texture to your combination. Ensure that your plants have well-drained soil and plenty of sun during the cooler seasons and you will be rewarded with a bounty of fresh picked Parsley throughout the fall and winter months.

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Jenny Jurgensen
About the Author

Jenny Jurgensen is a roller derby skater, gardening enthusiast and horticulturist at MasterTag – a horticultural printing company.


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Cool Season Container Herbs for the South

For a long & lush harvest

Use fresh, well-draining potting mix
Water deeply when soil is dry
Harvest regularly to stimulate new growth