Plants to Celebrate Spring’s Return


Plants to Celebrate Spring’s Return
  • Posted March 13, 2017

Late winter into early spring is when we crave fresh growth, a bit of color…some sign that spring is really returning! Swelling buds on Pussy Willow and dainty Snowdrop blooms - which might be overlooked or scoffed at if amongst the lushness of summer plant life - bring excitement, praise and hope. These are soon followed by bolder displays, as the likes of Forsythia, Tulips, Magnolias and more burst into bloom and cement our certainty of spring's return.

If you'd like to indulge in some of this excitement, look around your neighborhood and local parks this spring to note which plants catch your eye. Snap their portraits with your smart phone or camera, then seek them out at your local nursery to plant in your own yard as personal mood boosters come next spring!


Here's a short list of plants to get you started:


Perennial Flowers

Anemone/Windflower

Brunnera/Siberian Bugloss

Hellebore

English Primrose

Tip: Can be planted spring through autumn.


Flowering Bulbs

Hyacinth

Snowdrops

Tulips

Daffodils

Crocus

Tip: Should be planted in autumn.


Flowering Shrubs & Trees

Dogwood

Forsythia

Lilacs

Magnolias

Pussy Willow (the fuzzy catkins are flowers)

Flowering Quince

Redbud

Rhododendrons & Azaleas

Serviceberry/Juneberry

Witch Hazel

Winter Daphne

Tip: Can be planted spring through autumn.

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Flowering Quince (Chaenomeles speciosa)

Flowering Quince (Chaenomeles speciosa)

Vigorous shrub with tangled, spiny branches and glossy, round leaves. Vibrant blooms appear before the leaves emerge in spring. The flowers are followed by attractive yellow-green fruit that is edible if certain steps are taken. Harvest the fruits after frost for best flavor. Similar…

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Flowering Dogwood (Cornus florida)

Flowering Dogwood (Cornus florida)

This native of Eastern North America offers year 'round appeal and ease of care. Large spring blooms are followed by tiny berries that attract an array of birds. The show transitions with red hued autumn foliage yielding to a winter display of graceful, branching stems.

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Tulip (Tulipa Hybrid)

Tulip (Tulipa Hybrid)

Tulips come in a wonderful range of colors, with many flower form variations beyond the well known cup shape. The creative possibilities for a stunning spring display are endless. Regardless of differences in appearance, all tulips share a dislike of excess soil moisture.

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Crocus (Crocus hybrid)

Crocus (Crocus hybrid)

A welcome herald of spring! In northern climates crocus often emerge before winter’s last snows have melted away. Incredibly carefree, just allow foliage to grow after flowering so that the plant can replenish and nourish its bulbs for next season.

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Hyacinth (Hyacinthus orientalis)

Hyacinth (Hyacinthus orientalis)

One of the first flowers to appear in early spring. Popular for its intensely fragrant flowers that produce a rich, sweet smell. The lush flower clusters add elegance and charm to traditional perennial gardens.

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English Primrose (Primula acaulis)

English Primrose (Primula acaulis)

Adds a welcome splash of color to the early season landscape. Colorful, sometimes fragrant flowers bloom during cool weather. Easy to grow and very rewarding.

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Dawn Sherwood
About the Author

Dawn Ochsner is a landscape designer and garden writer.


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Plants to Celebrate Spring’s Return